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New pallet prices set to rise as timber prices increase

Latest News,Services March 16, 2017 1:50 pm

In Q4-2016, the UK pallet timber prices increased for the third quarter in a row. This is an increase in overall cost of 5.7% on the price of new timber used to manufacture pallets.

Demand for timber, for example in the construction industry, influences prices as more and more timber is required both as building materials and pallet manufacturing. The growth of the economy is fantastic news but increased demand implies price hikes which are hard to avoid.

Another contributing factor is the strength of the USD and the Euro against the weakening GBP. It’s common for industries requiring timber products to trade in these two currencies, therefore indicative prices increase.

Businesses that spend a lot of effort trying to mitigate price rises deserve to receive the products they need at competitive rates, but in return don’t deserve a fall in service levels. RPS believes that pallet supply should not suffer due to timber price increases. We understand that without pallets the vast majority of products cannot be transported.

Due to the latest trends, new pallet prices will undoubtedly start to increase over the coming weeks. Replacement reconditioned pallets, fit for purpose, are a great way to help reduce packaging spend and encourage environmental sustainability.

RPS supplies reconditioned pallets to support your product deliveries. With a quick turnaround time, RPS can deliver pallets to your site on time and in full, so your products to be packed and loaded ready for delivery.

With a vast range of reconditioned pallets available, take a look at the specifications we hold in stock. Or if you can’t see what you’re looking for, give us a call to discuss your requirements in more detail.

Let RPS help you save time, money and the environment. Think pallet, think RPS.

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